The Association for the Rehabilitation and Re-orientation of Women for Development (TERREWODE) has its headquarter in Soroti, Teso sub-region of eastern Uganda. It is a leading Ugandan non-profit organization (NGO), pioneering best practices to eliminate obstetric fistula in Uganda. It was founded in 1999 by Alice Emasu.

We aim to build capacity for communities to transform conventional healthcare and economic systems to improve the status and livelihood of women and girls, with a focus on maternal and child health.

We have driven the notion of obstetric fistula to become a domestic item in many households in Uganda. Despite this, statistics still indicate that 200,000 women and girl sufferers of fistula are in Uganda. Of these, there are 1,900 new cases yearly due to difficult childbirth. We however, support 600 affected women and girls for free surgeries countrywide annually.

While obstetric fistula affects the family and communities, its effects on the victims are more pronounced in ostracism, trauma and stigma, often leading to absolute poverty. Surgeries alone do not empower them to fight the stigma and reverse the gender and social inequalities in which fistula thrive. Social reintegration therefore, helps the women to walk a new life of dignity. We support 450 women victims of both curable and incurable fistula into our holistic social reintegration program annually. Social reintegration is a process and requires better understanding of the needs of the affected women and girls.

We know that treatment and social reintegration without unlocking the factors that cause obstetric fistula is not the solution.  Our holistic approach addresses prevention in a number of innovative ways.

Special thanks to Worldwide Fistula Fund, our lead development partner for the continuous funding support, Uganda Fistula Fund,  Oregon State University, The Birthing Project, Fund for Global Human Rights, Global Fund for Women, United Nations Fund for Population Activities, Engender health-Fistula Care Plus, One by One, Islamic Development Bank, Independent Development Fund, Grand Challenges-Canada, Argent Action Fund, Fistula Foundation, European Union, and Ashoka East Africa.

We owe a lot to the “End fistula” campaign in Uganda spearheaded by the Ugandan Ministry of Health, partners and collaborators. Most importantly we acknowledge the endless contribution of local leaders from our areas of operation; most especially the leaders of Teso sub-region.

Mission

Building community capacities to systematically empower women and girls to meaningfully participate in development activities to improve their livelihoods, families and communities.

Vision

Empowered women and girls embracing the world with improved livelihoods.

Letter From The Director

Local and international attention is galvanizing to eliminate obstetric fistula. Slowly but steadily, the word fistula is becoming a domestic item in many communities in Uganda. Largely, of course, it’s bad news and the world is yet to rejoice success in eliminating fistula thus, we should not be celebrating high numbers in this era.

Statistics indicate thus 200,000 women sufferers are in Uganda, especially within impoverished rural communities. Moreover 1,900 women and girls suffer fistula annually, often following difficult delivery, which in most cases results in stillbirth.

For the women and girls who are successfully surgically treated, one might expect the immediate response to be relief from ostracism, trauma and stigma, but this is not the case. Surgeries alone to reverse incontinence remain inadequate without strategies to wipe away traumatic memories of fistula. Surgeries alone do not empower the affected woman to fight stigma and unlock gender inequalities that perpetrate a cycle of poverty and denial of reproductive rights. Social reintegration therefore helps the women to walk a new life of dignity. It has proven helpful to those women with repeated failed fistula surgeries or incurable fistula conditions. TERREWODE continues to support both curable and incurable categories of women through its innovative and holistic social reintegration program. TERREWODE is happy to share with you the “Tears of Joy” 2014 Annual Report, which is a reflection of progress in its holistic fistula program to achieve a Uganda free from fistula.

Consequently, we identified and supported 600 affected women and girls to access free surgical treatment across the country; thanks to our partners and networks. Gratitude goes to the Ministry of Health, the doctors and the management of Mulago National Referral Hospital, Soroti, Mbale, Moroto, Mubende, Kayunga, Kiryandongo, Mityana, Namayengo, Amolatar and Lira Regional Referral and General Hospitals, including Health Centre IVs.

Social reintegration is a process, but most of the women treated were supported to begin the journey to fully socially reintegrate into  communities and live an improved quality of life. The program also builds the capacity of survivors to achieve economic empowerment and self-reliance to support themselves, their families and communities.

Special thanks to the Fistula Foundation, Worldwide Fistula Fund, Islamic Development Bank, Fund for Global Human Rights, Grand Challenges-Canada and Ashoka East Africa. We owe a lot to the “End fistula” campaign in Uganda spearheaded by the Ugandan Ministry of Health. In addition, we are greatful to the efforts by the Fistula Technical Working Group, Engender Health, AmrefHealth Africa, United Nations population Fund and Uganda Fistula Fund.

Regarding the CSO networks; including the Domestic Violence Coalition, HIV/PEP Coalition and the Partnership for Maternal, Child and Newborn Health, we appreciate their collaboration with greate respect. Last but not least, we recognize the support by the District Local Governments, Health facilities and the Obstetric Fistula Awareness and Advocacy Network (OFAAN) members, including the Fistula Survivors Solidarity Groups, the schools and the media especially from our areas of operations. We look forward to continued partnerships in 2016.

Alice Emasu                                                              

Alice Emasu

Alice Emasu

Founder and Executive Director

She is the founder and Executive Director of TERREWODE. She brings to TERREWODE 19 years of experience in   leadership, management and programing. Her passion for gender equality and social justice is the driving force for unlocking the health care and economic systems that disempower women and the girl-child. Alice is an outstanding social entrepreneur holding a Master of Social Work from the George Warren Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, USA; Master of Business Administration for social entrepreneur’s, University of Cattolica, Italy; a Bachelor of Arts in Mass Communication, Makerere University; a Diploma in Development Journalism, the Indian Institute of Mass Communication – New Dehli and a Diploma in Media and Democratization, the University of Oslo –Norway. She holds several certificates in Women Studies, Human Rights and Peace Studies.

Lillian E. B. Awizia

Lillian E. B. Awizia

Partnership, Networking and Advocacy Manager

She is responsible for community engagement, partnerships and collaborations. She holds a Master’s Degree in Management Science, Uganda Management Institute; a BSc. in Accounting and Finance, Kyambogo University; Post-Graduate Diploma in Project Planning and Management, Uganda Management Institute. Lillian has over 17 years of professional work experience. Formerly a civil servant, USAID and UNHCR consultant, she brings into TERREWODE a wide experience of managing partnerships and collaborations.

Lutie Kobusinge

Lutie Kobusinge

Finance and Administration Manager

She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration, Makerere University. She is a Certified Public Accountant. Working with limited resources yet achieving great impact for TERREWODE, Lutie is effectively utilizing her skills to promote finance and administrative best practices.

Martha Ibeno

Martha Ibeno

Head of Programmes

She holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Social Work and Social Administration with bias in psychosocial support and counseling, Makerere University. Martha is a holder of several certificates including Conflict Resolution and Peace Building and Gender and Women Studies. She strongly believes in the power of teamwork and participatory leadership.

Apio Stella

Apio Stella

Program Manager Eastern & Northern Region

She has a Bachelors’ Degree in Social Work and Social Administration with a major in research, Makerere University. She holds two certificates in Gender and Good governance and another in career guidance and counseling. She is strong advocate for the rights of grassroots women and girls.

Onzia Hope

Onzia Hope

Project Officer Social Reintegration

She holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Ethics and Development Studies with a bias to Entrepreneurship from Uganda Martyrs University. Hope is currently spearheading the scaling- up of our social reintegration best practice country wide.

Adiedo Mary Phiona

Adiedo Mary Phiona

Project Officer Psychosocial Services

She holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Guidance and Counseling from Kyambogo University. Mary is a team player and effectively uses her skills to promote psychosocial support through counseling as one key component of social reintegration.

Eboku Ronald

Eboku Ronald

Finance and Accounts Assistant

He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting and Finance from Kyambogo University. Ronald is currently pursuing a professional course (CPA-level II), and he is passionate about professionalism in the accounting field.

ALL STAFF PHOTOS BY: YOUSSEF EL HAMDAOUY